Jabberwocky-Translated

A Poem By Jackie West // 3/14/2012

 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
 Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
 All mimsy were the borogroves,
 And the mome raths outgrabe.'

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand,
Long time the manxome foe he sought-
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came.

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack.
He left it dead, and with its head,
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock, my son?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh, callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves,
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogroves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Many of us are familiar with the classic poem written by Lewis Carroll for the entertainment of his family-but do do we know what it really means?

 

It was four o'clock in the afternoon, and the lithe, slimy badger-like creatures went around and around and made holes in the grass-plot around a sundial; the birds that looked like mops were flimsy and miserable, and the green pig from home made a noise like something between a bellow and a whistle with a sneeze in the middle.
"Beware the Jabberwock, my son, the biting jaws and catching claws. Beware the Jubjub bird and shun the fuming and furious Bandersnatch!"
He took in his hand his deadly blade and sought is fearsome foe for a long time. The he rested by the Tumtum tree and stood in thought.
While he stood in ill-tempered, the Jabberwock, with flaming eyes, came blowing through the thick, dark wood, babbling as it came.
One, two! One, two! With a few swishes, the deadly blade went cutting through the Jabberwock. He left it dead and triumphantly galloped back home with its head.
"Have you slain the Jabberwock? come to my arms, my bright boy! What a fabulous day! Hurrah, hurray!" he chuckled gleefully in his joy.
It was four o'clock in the afternoon, and the lithe, slimy badger-like creatures went around and around and made holes in the grass-plot around a sundial; the birds that looked like mops were flimsy and miserable, and the green pig from home made a noise like something between a bellow and a whistle with a sneeze in the middle.

Comments

I prefer

I prefer my translation. It's more colourful.

Gina I. | Thu, 05/29/2014

insert something inspiring

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